For Weight Management

Controlling hunger starts with proteins from milk.

Consuming proteins from milk, such as whey, before or with a meal increases satiety.1 Proteins from milk have been proven to help people lose weight, without losing muscle or bulking up.2,3 Proteins from milk supplementation (with whey, casein and other dairy protein supplements) results in greater weight loss, greater fat loss and higher retention of lean mass. This is based on research from over 25 high-quality clinical trials.4 Proteins from milk, for example, are key to quality weight loss diets, those which result in greater loss of fat mass and overall body weight, and improvement in body composition.5 Supplementation with proteins from milk to manage weight is a feasible choice, even for those unable or unmotivated to exercise.6

Research has shown that proteins from milk, including whey, casein, milk protein concentrates and milk powders, can be a useful tool for people looking to manage their weight because they can: 

  • Help achieve improved body composition, help you tone, not bulk up.7,8
  • Result in significant decreases in waist circumference.9
  • Optimize the results from a reduced-calorie diet and exercise program by increasing fat loss, in particular abdominal fat.10
  • Boost metabolism by increasing lean muscle mass11 and stimulate muscle protein synthesis better than plant proteins.
  • Promote weight loss by making you feel fuller, longer. Even small amounts of whey protein, as low as 15g for example, can increase satiety.12

However, a large systematic review found that plant proteins were not associated with effects on body composition. Examples of other proteins studied include soy proteins, pea, barley, wheat, etc.13

1 Fekete, AA, et al. 2018. Whey protein lowers systolic blood pressure and Ca-caseinate reduces serum TAG after a high-fat meal in mildly hypertensive adults. Sci Rep. Mar 22;8(1):5026.

2 Hector, AJ, et al. 2015. Whey protein supplementation preserves postprandial myofibrillar protein synthesis during short-term energy restriction in overweight and obese adults. J Nutr. 2015 Feb;145(2):246-52.

3 Bergia, RE, et al. 2018. Effect of whey protein supplementation on body composition changes in women: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Nutr Rev online April 23.

4 Stonehouse, W, et al. 2016. Dairy Intake Enhances Body Weight and Composition Changes during Energy Restriction in 18-50-Year-Old Adults-A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Nutrients. 2016 Jul 1;8(7).

5 Miller, PE, et al. 2014. Effects of whey protein and resistance exercise on body composition: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. J Am Coll Nutr.; 33(2):163-75.

6 Kemmler, W, et al. 2018. Effect of whole-body electromyostimulation and / or protein supplementation on obesity and cardiometabolic risk in older men with sarcopenic obesity: the randomized controlled FranSO trial. BMC Geriatr. Mar 9;18(1):70.

7 Miller, PE, et al. 2014. Effects of whey protein and resistance exercise on body composition: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. J Am Coll Nutr.; 33(2):163-75.

8 Bergia, RE, et al. 2018. Effect of whey protein supplementation on body composition changes in women: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Nutr Rev online April 23.

9 Kemmler, W, et al. 2018. Effect of whole-body electromyostimulation and / or protein supplementation on obesity and cardiometabolic risk in older men with sarcopenic obesity: the randomized controlled FranSO trial. BMC Geriatr. Mar 9;18(1):70.

10 Kemmler, W, et al. 2018. Effect of whole-body electromyostimulation and / or protein supplementation on obesity and cardiometabolic risk in older men with sarcopenic obesity: the randomized controlled FranSO trial. BMC Geriatr. Mar 9;18(1):70.

Baer, D, et al. 2011. Whey Protein but Not Soy Protein Supplementation Alters Body Weight and Composition in Free-Living Overweight and Obese Adults. J. Nutri. 141, 1489-1494.

11 Morton, RW, et al. 2018. A systematic review, meta-analysis and meta-regression of the effect of protein supplementation on resistance training-induced gains in muscle mass and strength in healthy adults. Br J Sports Med. Mar;52(6):376-384.

12 King, DJ, et al. 2018. A small dose of whey protein co-ingested with mixed-macronutrient breakfast and lunch meals improves postprandial glycemia and suppresses appetite in men with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial. Am J Clin Nutr. Apr 1;107(4):550-557.

13 Chalvon-Demersay, T, et al. 2017. A systematic review of the effects of plat compared with animal protein sources on features of the metabolic syndrome. J Nutr. Mar;147(3):281-292.